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  • Writer's pictureMichael Freed

Is Tinder Catfishing Us Too?

Updated: Sep 7, 2023


Are dating apps like Tinder truly serving the purpose they were designed for? Recent research suggests that these platforms may not be as effective for meaningful connections as we'd like to think. With an increase in users seeking entertainment, distraction, and even unhealthy coping mechanisms, the need for a more genuine and human-centric approach to dating is becoming apparent. In-person singles events offer that much-needed alternative.

In a startling survey of more than 1,000 Tinder users, half declared they had no interest in meeting offline, and nearly two-thirds were already committed elsewhere, either married or "in a relationship." While Tinder boasts an estimated 75 million active users each month, making it the world's most popular dating app, a new study published in the journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking unveils that many aren't swiping with the intention to date at all.

The motivations behind people's usage of the app vary greatly, ranging from social connectedness to coping with negative emotions. The results reveal an overall dissatisfaction with the app, with an average rating of 2.39 on a 4-point scale, and only a slightly better satisfaction rating for offline dates at 3.05 on a 5-point scale.

Notably, those using the app to deal with negative emotions, such as depression and anxiety, found it to be an ineffective coping mechanism. Elias Aboujaoude, a clinical professor of psychiatry at Stanford University School of Medicine and an author of the study, even drew parallels between dating apps and social media, both of which can exacerbate mental health conditions.

While dating apps might have their place for casual entertainment, they fall short in creating genuine connections and can even foster unhealthy behaviors. This stark reality brings us to the undeniable value of in-person singles events.

In-person singles events offer an opportunity to engage in meaningful interactions with potential partners. They enable a level of authenticity and connection that online platforms often fail to provide. People attending these events are genuinely interested in forming relationships and are not hiding behind digital screens for entertainment or as a means to cope with negative feelings.

Moreover, in-person singles events are structured to foster communication, trust, and mutual interest. They cater to those who are serious about finding companionship, love, or even friendship. People who attend these events are more likely to approach dating with a healthy level of circumspection, much like older users of dating apps who tend to be more selective in their matches.

In conclusion, while dating apps like Tinder might still hold sway in numbers, they are clearly serving functions other than their intended purpose. The growing dissatisfaction with online dating platforms underscores the need for a return to human connection, transparency, and authenticity that only in-person singles events can offer.

For those truly interested in meaningful connections, the choice between the superficial swiping of a screen and the warmth of a face-to-face conversation seems clear. In-person singles events provide a better, more humane alternative, aligned with the true essence of human connection.

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